Planning for 2021 • How to Plan the Unplannable

Planning for 2021

Are you worried about planning for 2021? Here’s some tips and reassurance to help you make next year rock.

2020 sucked, y’all

I think we can all agree that 2020 is a year better left forgotten. I don’t know about you, but a lot of things I hoped and planned for in 2020 didn’t happen. I haven’t gotten to see my family since January 2020. My sister didn’t get to come visit in October. Trips were canceled, I lost friends and family, stress has been crazy, and my mental health is suffering. There were some things good things this year, such as publishing my debut novel Well of Vengeance and my first anniversary with my husband, but a lot of 2020 was spent trying to navigate the terrain that has become my new normal. I don’t think there is anything that I could’ve done to prepare for this year, not on a personal level. But, you know what? That’s okay. It’s okay that this year was such a crazy, scary thing because we can grow from it. We can take what we’ve lived through and turn those experiences into lenses in which to plan for the future through.

2021 can suck less

Yes, I said it. 2021 can suck less. I’m not saying that everything will magically fix themselves when the date flips to 01/01/2021, but that doesn’t mean you can’t look toward the future with excitement. Though your plans last year were canceled, postponed, or altered in one way or another, you learned a lot about yourself. You learned you’re strong and capable! You learned that even when everything gets effed up, you still make it through. Take those moments of perseverance and use them to tackle 2021.

Use SMART goals for planning in 2021

Many of us have probably heard of SMART goals, but here’s a refresher of what they are and why they’re important. SMART = Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-based. SMART goals take your dreams and desires and turn them into something you can map out to take you from point A to point B. For example, you can say “I want to write a book” or you can say “I want to write a book so I’m going to write one chapter a week until I finish it.” While the first goal sounds great, there’s no timeline or actionable steps. If you don’t give yourself a deadline, or even a starting date, then when are you going to start?

Systems to use for planning in 2021

There are many planning methods out there, from Kanban, to quarterly, bimonthly, monthly, biweekly, weekly, and daily. What you need to do is look at your own personal goals and find a type of planning system that works for you. I’m not gonna lie, it will most likely take a couple tries for you to figure out what works best for you, but it’s important to know what to system works best for you. If your planning system doesn’t work for you, then there’s a good chance you won’t want to continue with it. 

Final thoughts

Don’t let your 2020 influence 2021. This year was a dumpster fire, but that was just one year out of, what? Dozens? Use this year as a learning experience, as a reminder to make your goals a little more flexible than you may have a year or two ago. The universe likes to test you, it’s up to you to keep fighting. Go, set your goals, share them in the comments or tag me on Instagram. You’ve got this!

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